Let’s Get Ready

divider
press release

SESAME WORKSHOP AND PSEG HELP FAMILIES GET READY FOR EMERGENCIES

New Sesame Street Resources Seek to Help Families Develop an Emergency Plan Together

(New York, NY October 7, 2014)  – In 2013, more than 85 nationally declared emergencies including hurricanes, tornados, floods and fires were recorded, and yet, according to a national survey, 60% of families in the U.S. do not have any emergency plan.  In response, Sesame Workshop, the nonprofit organization behind Sesame Street, has partnered with PSEG Foundation, the philanthropic arm of Public Service Enterprise Group (PSEG), to develop Let’s Get Ready: Planning Together for Emergencies, and Here For Each Other: Helping Families After Emergencies, free emergency preparedness and response initiatives in English and Spanish.

The PSEG Foundation has committed $1.3 million to develop the initiatives aimed at instituting emergency preparedness into families’ routines through simple tips, strategies, and activities, as well as prepare families with effective and comforting ways to respond when a disaster occurs.

With the help from Elmo, Let’s Get Ready and Here For Each Other launched today, October 7, with a community event at the Ironbound Early Learning Center in Newark, NJ, and will be followed by an event in Long Beach, Long Island on October 9.  Both locations were heavily impacted by Superstorm Sandy in 2012. The Ironbound section of Newark was the only location within the city to be flooded. Long Beach, Long Island, one of the hardest hit New York communities, is still struggling to recover with a large percentage of homes still uninhabitable.

“Sesame Workshop, with our beloved Sesame Street Muppets, has always addressed educational and community needs through the creative use of media,” said Dr. Jeanette Betancourt, Senior Vice President for Community and Family Engagement at Sesame Workshop. “We believe that a better tomorrow begins by raising smarter, stronger and kinder children today, and in partnership with PSEG, we’re helping families not only create stronger children, but stronger communities as a whole through our emergency preparedness and response initiative.”

“We all try our best to be prepared for an emergency like Superstorm Sandy. But we may not always know when a crisis will strike, which is why it’s so critical for families to talk about action plans proactively,” said Ellen Lambert, President of the PSEG Foundation. “In preparing for an emergency, everyone in the family needs to be involved in planning, including young children. This unique partnership with Sesame Workshop will help ensure that there are tangible long-term impacts to helping families be prepared.”

Let’s Get Ready! Planning Together for Emergencies helps adults explain to young children various ways they can be physically and emotionally prepared for an emergency. Resources include a free Sesame Street Let’s Get Ready Mobile App (available on iOS, Android, and Kindle) and an online toolkit with video and downloadable resources (http://www.sesamestreet.org/ready) for parents, caregivers, educators and children.

The materials are free for anyone to download.  PSEG plans to distribute fliers with information on how to download the information at children’s parks. PSEG will also have employee volunteers distribute information to child care centers in New Jersey cities like Newark, Jersey City, Camden, and Trenton. Every employee will be encouraged to share the information their home towns.

The materials offer tips on how families can prepare their children for an emergency in age-appropriate ways such as:

  • Everyone, even young children, can play a role in planning for the unexpected.
  • Creating an emergency plan that the entire family practices, and shares with the significant people in their lives is important.
  • Helping children learn personal information such as a phone number, their full names, and the names of special people in their home, is helpful in case of any emergency.

Here for Each Other: Helping Families After Emergencies helps adults and children cope with disasters. These resources provide ways to talk as a family about what happened, while remaining hopeful for better things to come. With this information families can create a comfortable and caring environment, no matter where they are, even when they are not surrounded by their familiar things. Resources include an online toolkit which contains Sesame Street videos, highlighting the importance of asking questions, showing comfort, and coping with emotions. Additional downloadable resources include a family and community guide.

The materials offer strategies on how families can respond to their children after an emergency in age-appropriate ways such as:

  • Comforting a child and spending quality time together can be the best reassurance that everything will be okay.
  • Even though there has been a big change, simple routines can help children feel safe and secure.
  • Children feel more secure when they know what is happening around them. Use simple words to explain what happened, and listen to your child’s questions and concerns.
  • There are many people around who are ready and willing to help (firefighters, doctors, police, volunteers, etc.). These are caring adults children can talk to and ask questions.

Additionally, the interactive tools help parents develop key skills with their children to prepare for an emergency, including:

  • Learn First and Last Names to help children learn not only their own full names, but those of their family members in case they get separated during an emergency.
  • Where I Live to help kids learn and remember their home address.
  • Neighborhood Resources to teach children about the kind folks they can rely on in case of an emergency, like police officers and firefighters.

About Sesame Workshop:

Sesame Workshop is the nonprofit educational organization behind Sesame Street, which reaches 156 million children across more than 150 countries. The Workshop’s mission is to use the educational power of media to help all children reach their highest potential. Delivered through a variety of platforms, including television programs, digital experiences, books and community engagement, its research-based programs are tailored to the needs of the communities and countries they serve, helping children everywhere grow smarter, stronger and kinder. For more information, visit us at www.sesameworkshop.org.

About the PSEG Foundation:

The PSEG Foundation (501c3) is the philanthropic arm of Public Service Enterprise Group (NYSE:PEG). The Foundation generally supports and invests in programs in three areas: community and the environment, education, and safety. The Foundation provides grants to organizations in communities served by PSEG and its subsidiaries. PSEG (NYSE: PEG) is a diversified energy company based in Newark NJ. PSEG has three main subsidiaries: PSE&G, NJ’s largest and oldest combined gas and electric delivery company, PSEG Power, a merchant power generation company and PSEG Long Island, operator of the Long Island Power Authority’s transmission and distribution system. For more information, visit www.pseg.com

Visit PSEG at:

www.pseg.com
PSEG on Facebook
PSEG on Twitter

Visit Sesame Street at:

www.sesamestreet.org
Sesame Street on Facebook
Sesame Street on Twitter
The Sesame Street YouTube Channel

Contacts:

Pam Hacker
Sesame Workshop
212.875.6225
pam.hacker@sesameworkshop.org
http://www.sesameworkshop.org/press-room/emergency/

 

Lee Sabatini
PSEG
973-430-5122
973-985-6269 (cell)
Lee.Sabatini@pseg.com

divider
comunicado de prensa

SESAME WORKSHOP Y PSEG AYUDAN A LAS FAMILIAS A PREPARARSE PARA LAS EMERGENCIAS

Nuevos recursos de Sesame Street ayudan a las familias a desarrollar juntos un plan de emergencia

7 de octubre de 2014 (Nueva York). En 2013, más de 85 emergencias fueron registradas a nivel nacional, incluyendo huracanes, tornados, inundaciones e incendios. Sin embargo, según una encuesta nacional, 60% de las familias de los Estados Unidos no tienen un plan de emergencia[1]. En respuesta, Sesame Workshop, la organización sin fines de lucro que produce Sesame Street, ha colaborado con la Fundación PSEG, la división filantrópica de Public Service Enterprise Group (PSEG), para desarrollar Preparémonos: Planificando juntos para emergencias y Cuidándonos uno al otro: Consejos para las familias después de una emergencia, dos iniciativas gratis en inglés y español de preparación para emergencias y la recuperación después de una emergencia.

La Fundación PSEG se ha comprometido con 1.3 millones de dólares para desarrollar estas iniciativas destinadas a establecer rutinas de preparación familiar para emergencias a través de consejos sencillos, estrategias y actividades, además de preparar a las familias con maneras eficaces y consoladoras para responder cuando ocurra un desastre. 

Con la ayuda de Elmo, Preparémonos y Cuidándonos uno al otro fueron presentadas hoy, el 7 de octubre, en un evento para la comunidad en el Ironbound Community Corp. Preschool en Newark (Nueva Jersey), seguido por un evento en Long Beach (Long Island) el 9 de octubre. Ambos lugares fueron afectados por la súper tormenta Sandy en 2012. El sector Ironbound de Newark fue el único sector inundado en Newark. Long Beach en Long Island fue una de las comunidades más afectadas por la tormenta en Nueva York y hasta hoy sigue luchando en su recuperación con un gran número de hogares aún sin poder ser habitadas.

“Sesame Workshop, con nuestros queridos Muppets de Sesame Street, siempre ha respondido a las necesidades educacionales y comunitarias a través del uso de los medios creativos”, dijo Dr. Jeanette Betancourt, Vicepresidenta Principal, Alcance Comunitario de Sesame Workshop. “Creemos que un futuro mejor empieza con niños que crecen con inteligencia, fortaleza y bondad. Junto a PSEG, ayudamos a las familias, y la comunidad en general, a fomentar la fortaleza en los niños a través de esta iniciativa de preparación y recuperación de emergencias”.

“Todos tratamos lo mejor que podemos de estar preparados para las emergencias, como la súper tormenta Sandy. No siempre sabemos cuándo una crisis sucederá, y por eso es esencial que las familias hablen de manera proactiva sobre sus planes de acción”, dijo Ellen Lambert, Presidenta de la Fundación PSEG. “Al prepararnos para una emergencia, toda la familia debe estar involucrada en la planificación, incluso los niños pequeños. Esta colaboración con Sesame Workshop asegurará que haya un impacto a largo plazo al ayudar a las familias a estar preparadas”. 

¡Preparémonos! Planificando juntos para emergencias ayuda a los adultos a explicarles a los niños pequeños las varias maneras en las que pueden prepararse física y emocionalmente para una emergencia. Los recursos incluyen una aplicación móvil gratis, Sesame Street Preparémonos (disponible en iOS, Android y Kindle), y un kit en línea con videos y recursos descargables (http://www.sesamestreet.org/ready) para padres, cuidadores, educadores y niños.

Los materiales están disponibles gratis para quienes quieran descargalos. PSEG planifica distribuir volantes en los parques infantiles sobre cómo descargar los materiales. También PSEG tendrá sus empleados que, de forma voluntaria, repartirán la información en los centros de cuidado infantil en las ciudades de Nueva Jersey, como Newark, Camden y Trenton. Cada empleado participante compartirá la información en su propio vecindario.

Los materiales ofrecen consejos sobre cómo las familias pueden preparar a sus niños para una emergencia de acuerdo a sus edades:

  • Todos, hasta los niños pequeños, pueden prepararse en planificar para lo inesperado.
  • Es importante crear un plan de emergencia que la familia entera pueda practicar y compartir con sus seres queridos.
  • En caso de una emergencia, es muy útil ayudar a los niños a aprender información personal, como un número telefónico, sus nombres completos y los nombres de las personas en casa.

 

Cuidándonos uno al otro: Consejos para las familias después de una emergencia ayuda a los adultos y a los niños a lidiar con un desastre. Estos recursos proveen maneras de conversar en familia sobre lo que ocurrió, al mantener una perspectiva positiva del futuro. Con esta información, las familias pueden crear un entorno de consuelo y cuidado, sin importar dónde estén, y hasta cuando no estén en su entorno familiar. Los recursos incluyen un kit en línea con videos de Sesame Street y destacan la importancia de hacer preguntas, dar consuelo y controlar las emociones. Recursos descargables adicionales incluyen una guía para la familia y la comunidad.

Los materiales ofrecen estrategias sobre cómo las familias pueden comunicarse con sus niños después de una emergencia de acuerdo a sus edades:

  • Consolar a un niño y pasar momentos de calidad juntos puede ser la mejor manera de asegurar al niño que todo estará bien.
  • Aunque haya un gran cambio, las rutinas sencillas pueden ayudar a los niños a sentirse seguros y protegidos.
  • Los niños se sienten más seguros cuando saben qué está pasando a su alrededor. Use palabras sencillas para explicar lo que ha sucedido y escuche las preguntas y preocupaciones de sus niños.
  • Hay muchas personas que están listas y que quieren ayudar (bomberos, doctores, policía, voluntarios, etc.). Estos son adultos con quienes los niños pueden conversar y hacer preguntas.

 

Adicionalmente, las herramientas interactivas ayudan a los padres a desarrollar destrezas claves con sus niños para prepararse para una emergencia, incluyendo:

  • Aprender sus nombres y apellidos no solo de los niños, sino también de los miembros de sus familias en caso de que se separen durante una emergencia.
  • Dónde vivo para ayudar a los niños a aprender y recordar la dirección de su casa.
  • Los recursos del vecindario para enseñar a los niños sobre las personas amables en quiénes pueden confiar en caso de una emergencia, como la policía y los bomberos. 

Sobre Sesame Workshop:

Sesame Workshop es la organización educacional sin fines de lucro que produce Sesame Street, el cual alcanza 156 millones de niños a través de más de 150 países. La misión de Sesame Workshop es utilizar el poder educativo de los medios de comunicación para ayudar a los niños en todas partes a crecer con inteligencia, fortaleza y bondad. Ofrecidos a través de una variedad de plataformas, incluidos programas de televisión, experiencias digitales, libros y alcance comunitario, sus programas basados en investigación están adaptados a las necesidades de las comunidades y los países que sirven. Para más información, visítenos en www.sesameworkshop.org.

Sobre la Fundación PSEG:

La fundación PSEG (501c3) es la rama filantrópica del Public Service Enterprise Group (NYSE:PEG). La fundación apoya e invierte generalmente en programas en tres áreas: comunidad y medio ambiente, educación y seguridad. La fundación otorga subvenciones a organizaciones en las comunidades atendidas por PSEG y sus filiales. PSEG (NYSE: PEG) es una compañía de energía diversificada con sede en Newark (Nueva Jersey). PSEG tiene tres filiales principales: PSE&G, la compañía de gas y energía combinada más grande y antigua de Nueva Jersey, PSEG Power, una compañía mercantil de generación de energía, y PSEG Long Island, operador del sistema de transmisión y distribución del Long Island Power Authority. Para más información, visite www.pseg.com.

 

 

Visite Sesame Street:

www.sesamestreet.org
Sesame Street en Facebook
Sesame Street en Twitter
The Sesame Street YouTube Channel

Contactos:

 

Pam Hacker
Sesame Workshop
212.875.6225
pam.hacker@sesameworkshop.org
http://www.sesameworkshop.org/press-room/emergency/

 

Lee Sabatini
PSEG
973-430-5122
973-985-6269 (celular)
Lee.Sabatini@pseg.com

[1] Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). (2013). FEMA and Ad Council Help Americans Prepare for Severe Weather. Obtenido de: http://www.fema.gov/news-release/2013/05/30/fema-and-ad-council-help-americans-prepare-severe-weather

divider
project overview

Download the Let’s Get Ready Project Overview

Download the Here for Each Other Project Overview

Let’s Get Ready Project Overview

The Need

In 2013, there were 95 nationally declared emergencies1. A national survey discovered that 60% of families in the U.S. do not have any emergency plan at all.2 Low-income populations were found to be even less prepared, with 79% of respondents in a survey conducted by Columbia’s National Center for Disaster Preparedness relaying that they did not have complete emergency plans.3

There is currently a lack of engaging, family-oriented material to support families with young children to foster their development of preparation strategies for emergencies. With helpful resources and support from community organizations, first responders, and other caring adults, families with young children can learn helpful strategies to prepare for emergencies.

The Project

Sesame Workshop, the nonprofit educational organization behind Sesame Street, along with PSEG, have partnered on an emergency preparedness initiative called Let’s Get Ready: Planning Together For Emergencies. This new multimedia, bilingual (English and Spanish) program will leverage the power of the beloved Sesame Street friends to help young children (ages 2-5) and families prepare for the unexpected.

Project Goals

Let’s Get Ready is intended to:

  • Institute emergency preparedness into families’ routines through play, hands-on investigation, and learning;
  • Present emergency preparedness as a necessary part of the overall well-being of children and families;
  • Offer national and local service organizations resources to help families prepare for emergencies.

Project Components

All project components are available on desktop, tablet, and mobile devices.

Family & Community Resources

  • Family Guide with tips and activities for parents to prepare the family for possible emergencies.
  • Power Safety Tip Sheet with tips to help families maintain a safe home and prevent power problems.
  • Community Event Host Guide with information, ideas, and activities for community organizations to incorporate these materials into events where members of the community come together to connect.

Educator Resources

  • Educator Guide with information and activity ideas to help educators talk with children about preparing for emergencies and staying safe.

A Digital Media Experience

  • Sesame Street Web site (sesamestreet.org/ready) filled with downloadable resources that aim to help families with young children prepare for emergencies. Access to the Web site is available on desktop, tablet, and on mobile at m.sesamestreet.org/ready.
  • Mobile App for iOS, Android, and Amazon Kindle that caregivers can use with their young children to help them learn about ways to prepare for an emergency:
    • a song that allows children to record their first and last name as well as their parents’ first and last names;
    • a game that helps kids match the neighborhood helpers to their places (firefighter/ firehouse, and so on);
    • a “Where I Live” activity so a child can photograph his home and label it with his address;
    • a customizable digital checklist for parents to help build their emergency kits
1 Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). (2013) Disaster Declarations for 2013. Retrieved from: http://www.fema.gov/disasters/grid/year 2 Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). (2013). FEMA and Ad Council Help Americans Prepare for Severe Weather. Retrieved from: http://www.fema.gov/news-release/2013/05/30/fema- and-ad-council-help-americans-prepare-severe-weather 3. Ambramson, D. Lions, Lamb & Lone Wolves: Archetypical Disaster Roles and their Relationship to Preparedness Behaviors. Retrieved from: http://ncdptraining.cumc.columbia.edu/ ~columbia/files/Abramson%20APHA%202010%20Lions%20Lambs%20Lone %20Wolves%20poster.pdf

Here for Each Other Project Overview

The Need

In 2012, 905 natural disasters were recorded worldwide with 26 percent in the United States.1 In 2013, there have been 85 nationally declared emergencies.2

There is a substantial body of research detailing the effects of natural disasters and emergency situations on young children’s academic achievement, physical health, and emotional well-being. When a disaster occurs, 70-80% of displaced persons are typically women and children.3 Research has shown that natural disasters and emergency situations can be especially traumatic for young children, causing them to experience emotional and physical exhaustion, fear, anxiety, as well as behavior regression.4

These materials support families with young children to foster their development of coping mechanisms when a disaster does occur. Our trusted characters have an emotional connection with kids that can help them in times of stress.

The Project

Sesame Workshop, the nonprofit educational organization behind Sesame Street, along with PSEG, have partnered on a new emergency response initiative called Here for Each Other: Helping Families After Emergencies. This multimedia, bilingual (English and Spanish) program leverages the power of the beloved Sesame Street friends to help young children (ages 2-5) and families respond to and cope with emergencies.

Project Goals

Here for Each Other is intended to:

  • Assist caregivers in talking to children in an age-appropriate way about emergencies and disasters;
  • Help families with young children cope with and manage strong emotions that result after a disaster occurs, as well as implement and maintain routines that help children feel secure and cared for; and
  • Offer national and local service organizations resources to help families respond to emergencies.

Project Components

All project components are available on desktop, tablet, and mobile devices.

Family Guide

  • Includes tips for parents on how to explain disasters to children, establish and maintain routines during a disaster, and strategies for helping children identify and manage their emotions during a difficult time. The guide includes activities for children to help them express themselves and identify those in the community who can help during an emergency.
  • Additional materials include separate Family Guides addressing six specific disasters: blizzards, earthquakes, fires, floods, hurricanes, and tornadoes.

Community Provider Guide

  • Provides an overview of the key content and how community organizations may use the content with children and families. The guide includes information on ways to comfort children, ideas for keeping children entertained, establishing a sense of community with the families they serve, and tips to help adults manage stress and have hope for the future.
  • Additional materials include an emergency responder tip sheet.

A Digital Media Experience

  • Sesame Street Web site (sesamestreet.org/ emergencies) filled with downloadable resources that help families with young children stay safe and respond to emergencies and disaster situations. Access to the Web site is available on desktop, tablet, and on mobile at m.sesamestreet.org/emergencies.
  • Family Comfort Moments Videos: Short Muppet segments around asking questions, showing comfort, and coping with emotions. These will play a role in helping families cope as they experience an emergency or disaster situation.

1. Low, P. (2013). Natural Catastrophes in 2012 Dominated by U.S. Weather Extremes. Vital Signs Trends. Retrieved from: http://vitalsigns.worldwatch.org/vs-trend/natural-catastrophes-2012-dominated-us-weather-extremes
2. Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). (2013) Disaster Declarations for 2013. Retrieved from: http://www.fema.gov/disasters/grid/year
3. Mahar, P., Lynch, J., Wathen, J., Tham, E., Berman, S. Disasters and their Effects on the Population: Key Concepts. 2010. Retrieved from: http://www.aap.org/en-us/advocacy-and-policy/aap-health-initiatives/children-and-disasters/Documents/ MANUAL-01-internacional-2011.pdf
4. Lazarus, P., Jimerson, S., Brock, S. (2003). Responding to Natural Disasters: Helping Children and Families: Information for School Crisis Teams. Retrieved from: http://www.nasponline.org/resources/crisis_safety/naturaldisaster_teams_ho.aspx
divider
tip sheets
divider
artwork

Preparedness

Response

divider
video
  • Let’s Get Ready and Here For Each Other Long Island Launch (Oct. 9, Long Beach, NY)

    In 2013, more than 85 nationally declared emergencies including hurricanes, tornados, floods and fires were recorded, and yet, according to a national survey, 60% of families in the U.S. do not have any emergency plan. In response, Sesame Workshop, the nonprofit organization behind Sesame Street, has partnered with PSEG Foundation, the philanthropic arm of Public Service Enterprise Group (PSEG), to develop Let’s Get Ready: Planning Together for Emergencies, and Here For Each Other: Helping Families After Emergencies.

    Watch on YouTube
  • Let’s Get Ready and Here For Each Other Launch (Oct. 7, Newark, NJ)

    In 2013, more than 85 nationally declared emergencies including hurricanes, tornados, floods and fires were recorded, and yet, according to a national survey, 60% of families in the U.S. do not have any emergency plan. In response, Sesame Workshop, the nonprofit organization behind Sesame Street, has partnered with PSEG Foundation, the philanthropic arm of Public Service Enterprise Group (PSEG), to develop Let’s Get Ready: Planning Together for Emergencies, and Here For Each Other: Helping Families After Emergencies.

    Watch on YouTube
  • Here For Each Other sizzle reel

    Resource highlights from Sesame Street’s Let’s Get Ready (emergency preparedness) and Here For Each Other (emergency response) initiatives, brought to you by PSEG. These new digital, bilingual resources include tips, activity ideas, and an app that together will help families and community providers prepare for the unexpected, and provide ways to respond during difficult times.

    Watch on YouTube
  • Let’s Get Ready Tutorial

    Prepare your family for the unexpected with Sesame Street’s Let Get Ready app! This engaging, interactive app helps families prepare for emergencies in simple ways, as children learn basic information to help them stay safe and make them proud to be prepared!

    Watch on YouTube
  • Let's Get Ready Tutorial (en español)

    Prepare a su familia para lo inesperado con la aplicación Preparémonos de Sesame Street. Esta atrayente aplicación interactiva ayuda a las familias a prepararse para las emergencias de manera sencilla a la vez que los niños aprenden información básica que los ayudará a mantenerse a salvo y ¡a sentirse orgullosos de estar preparados!

    Watch on YouTube
divider
advisors

American Red Cross Scientific Advisory Council

Angela Mickalide, PhD, MCHES

Angela Mickalide, PhD, MCHES, is the Principal Investigator and Program Director of the Emergency Medical Services for Children National Resource Center at Children’s National Medical Center.  She serves as the direct liaison to the EMSC federal program at the Health Resources and Services Administration.  Her responsibilities include fiscal oversight of the four-year, $6 million dollar HRSA cooperative agreement, leading a staff of nine employees, and developing and implementing the annual work plan.  A graduate of the Johns Hopkins School of Public Health, Dr. Mickalide has published 90 articles, book chapters and research reports, as well as delivered numerous keynote presentations and print and broadcast media interviews.  She serves on the editorial board of the American Journal of Preventive Medicine and formerly served on the editorial boards of Injury Prevention, Health Education and Behavior and Health Promotion Practice. Dr. Mickalide graduated as a Scholar in the Public Health Education Leadership Institute (PHELI).  She is serving a four-year term on the CDC National Center for Injury Prevention and Control’s Board of Scientific Counselors.

Child Mind Institute Stress & Resilience Program

Child Mind Institute Stress & Resilience Program: The Child Mind Institute is dedicated to transforming mental health care for children everywhere. Founded by Dr. Harold S. Koplewicz and Brooke Garber Neidich, our organization is committed to finding more effective treatments for childhood psychiatric and learning disorders, building the science of healthy brain development, and empowering children and their families with help, hope, and answers. The Child Mind Institute does not accept funding from the pharmaceutical industry.

Myla Harrison, MD, MPH

Dr. Myla Harrison is Medical Director of the Bureau of Child, Youth and Families within the Division of Mental Hygiene at the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (DOHMH). In this role, she has responsibility to improve upon the system of care for children (birth through young adulthood) with mental health needs, and to ensure that their families receive the support they need. She previously held the position of Assistant Commissioner of the Bureau from January 2005 through January 2010 and before coming to DOHMH in 2003, she worked at the Mount Sinai Medical Center as Medical Director of the Outpatient Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Service for 4 years, and the Director of the Inpatient Child Psychiatry unit for the 4 years before that.

Dr. Harrison is board-certified in Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and General Psychiatry and is a board-eligible Pediatrician. She received her M.D. degree from Downstate Medical Center in Brooklyn in 1989 and an M.P.H. degree in Healthcare Management from Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health in 2007.

 

divider
partners

PSEG Foundation

The PSEG Foundation (501c3) is the philanthropic arm of Public Service Enterprise Group (NYSE:PEG). The Foundation generally supports and invests in programs in three areas: community and the environment, education, and safety. The Foundation provides grants to organizations in communities served by PSEG and its subsidiaries. PSEG (NYSE: PEG) is a diversified energy company based in Newark NJ. PSEG has three main subsidiaries: PSE&G, NJ’s largest and oldest combined gas and electric delivery company, PSEG Power, a merchant power generation company and PSEG Long Island, operator of the Long Island Power Authority’s transmission and distribution system. For more information, visit www.pseg.com.

More About PSEG
divider