our blog

December 09, 2013

Tags
share this +

A Recipe for Cooking Up a Fun and Furry Children’s App

By Karen Halpenny


Karen Halpenny is a Senior Editor, Publishing & Senior Manager, Digital Publishing at Sesame Workshop.

David Kleeman, President of the American Center for Children and Media and PlayVangelist at PlayCollective, challenged content creators to make an “ingredients” list for their educational media. Challenge accepted!

App Name: Peekaboo Sesame Street

Goals:

  1. Design an app for the youngest segment of our audience to engage them with our characters in an age-appropriate interactive way.
  2. Introduce toddlers to the basics of how to use a tablet since we know they’re using these devices in increasing numbers.
  3. Integrate some fun into learning focused on science curriculum (prediction and cause & effect).

Approximate time required: 6 months

Yield: 1 app  Read More

share this +
printprint
divider

October 30, 2013

Tags
share this +

Remembering Jerry Nelson

By Sesame Workshop


An original work of art by Carroll Spinney. Carroll plays the iconic Sesame Street characters Big Bird and Oscar the Grouch

Jerry Nelson, best known as the puppeteer of the iconic Count von Count, Herry Monster, Fat Blue, the Amazing Mumford and many more was a beloved member of the Sesame Street family for over 40 years. In a testament to the lasting impact his humor and talent made on the Sesame Street cast and crew, cast members Emilio Delgado and Sonia Manzano and puppeteer Fran Brill graciously offered remembrances of Jerry’s life and work. In addition puppeteer Carroll Spinney, best known for his work as Big Bird and Oscar the Grouch, drew an original work of art commemorating some of Jerry’s most famous characters.

On Thursday, Oct. 31, Sesame Street will honor his memory by airing a special Count Von Count episode. We hope you will tune in and celebrate the life and work of a man who holds a special place in the hearts of the entire Sesame Street family.  Read More

share this +
printprint
divider

October 23, 2013

Tags
share this +

The Story of the Sesame Street Dictionary: Parts 2 & 3

By Betsy Loredo


Betsy Loredo is the executive editor of Sesame Workshop’s publishing group.

PART 2: The Artist

Once you get to know Joe Mathieu a little better, it’s easy to see why he was the perfect choice  to illustrate the Sesame Street Dictionary.

He’s the one on the right above.

“Jim Henson encouraged me to go to the Muppet workshop and sketch and photograph the characters in the ‘morgue,’” Joe explained when he shared this shot with us. To tackle more than 1300 words, Random House author Linda Hayward, Sesame editor Anna Jane Hays, and Joe together intended to feature many obscure, cult-favorite characters from the show. For a list of the ones to look for in the finished book, check out Muppet WikiRead More

share this +
printprint
divider

October 21, 2013

Tags
share this +

The Story of the Sesame Street Dictionary: Part 1

By Betsy Loredo


Betsy Loredo is the executive editor of Sesame Workshop’s publishing group.

PART 1: The Quest

How do you define a concept as big as “I” or as difficult as “easy” to someone as little as a 4-year-old? Go ahead – try explaining the words “of” or even “off”…using words that someone who still employs a binkie can understand.

Yup. Not so easy.

It’s certainly a whole lot simpler to express an idea like “alligator” or “banana.” A toothy green reptile is a concept that you can really wrap your mind around without one word of text, if you’ve got a telling piece of art:  Read More

share this +
printprint
divider

October 11, 2013

Tags
share this +

Sesame Street Teaches Literacy with New Digital Destination

By Graydon Gordian


By the age of four, a child from a high-income family has been exposed to 35 million more words than a child from a low-income family. Low-income children miss out on over 400 hours of literacy-related activities that high-income children experience. This gap in literacy and vocabulary must be closed. That’s why Sesame Workshop has partnered with the Insurance Industry Charitable Foundation, known as the IICF, to launch Every Day is a Reading and Writing Day, a digital resource that will help children improve their reading and writing skills from an early age.

Every Day is  Reading and Writing Day includes videos, games, and activities for children and parents that will help young children develop the critical literacy abilities they need as they enter kindergarten. It also includes tips for parents, caregivers and volunteers who are looking for effective ways to encourage the children in their lives to read and write.

This wonderful multimedia educational tool wouldn’t be possible without the support of the IICF. Since 1994, the IICF has provided grants, volunteer service and leadership to communities throughout the country. By partnering with Sesame Workshop, the IICF’s commitment to improving literacy rates across America has found a furry and fun-filled expression online.

To learn more about the Insurance Industry Charitable Foundation and all the work it does to support communities and enrich lives across the United States, click here. To explore the videos, games and other digital tools Sesame is using to increase literacy across the country, click here.

share this +
printprint
divider

October 02, 2013

Tags
share this +

A Day in the Life of a Sesame Street Live Performer

By Carlos Ivan Irizarry


Carlos Ivan Irizarry is performs as Bert in the Sesame Street Live production “Make a New Friend.” We’d like to thank Carlos for giving us a glimpse into the daily life of a Sesame Street Live performer.

My life as a Sesame Street Live performer is awesome. It’s amazing to bring the Sesame Street characters to life on stage across the country. I play Bert in Sesame Street Live “Make a New Friend.” I’m also a backup dancer, so I dress as a giant chocolate chip cookie for Cookie Monster’s “Me Want Cookie” solo, and wear a sparkling gold jacket to dance with Count Von Count in “Count Me In.” These roles allow me to see the crowd through my own eyes, as well as Bert’s. I find myself smiling no matter what costume I’m wearing, as the families in the crowd are so excited.  Read More

share this +
printprint
divider

September 16, 2013

Tags
share this +

Season 44 of Sesame Street is Finally Here!

By Graydon Gordian


Season 44 of Sesame Street is finally here! The season, which launches today, is full of fun new additions to the neighborhood. Armando, played by Ismael Cruz Córdova, joins the cast and beloved Cookie Monster hosts a new segment: Crumby Pictures Presents.

The focus of Crumby Pictures Presents is our self-regulation curriculum. Self-regulation is a set of critical skills for preschoolers that affects children socially, behaviorally, and academically. Unfortunately, children often begin kindergarten without important skills such as being able to follow directions, stay on task with focused attention, and regulate their own emotions using concrete strategies. Kindergarten teachers report that over half of their students start school lacking good self-regulation abilities even though they are seen by many as being more essential for school readiness than academic skills such as counting or recognizing letters.

Fortunately, self-regulation skills can be taught during the preschool years and development of these skills happens rapidly. These skills and strategies are at the center of every laugh and lesson learned in Crumby Pictures Present, as well as many new online games produced by Sesame Workshop.

To learn more about Season 44 and all the laughs Cookie Monster, Armando, and the whole gang have in store, click here.

share this +
printprint
divider

August 12, 2013

Tags
share this +

Me Want It (But Me Wait)

By Graydon Gordian


Last week Sesame Street released Cookie Monster’s latest spoof: a hilarious take on Icona Pop’s hit song “I Love It.” Sesame Street launches its 44th season on September 16th, 2013 with a new self-regulation and executive function curriculum. Cookie Monster, the poster-child for someone needing to master self-regulation skills, attempts to explain these concepts while devising personal strategies on waiting to eat a cookie.

Tune-in to a new season of Sesame Street beginning September 16th, 2013 on PBSKids!

share this +
printprint
divider

Season 44 of Sesame Street Features a New Neighbor and a New Segment

By Graydon Gordian


Sesame Workshop, the non-profit behind numerous iconic educational children’s shows in the United States and around the world, is excited to announce the launch of Season 44 of Sesame Street. This season is full of fun new additions to the neighborhood. Armando, played by Ismael Cruz Córdova, joins the cast and beloved Cookie Monster hosts a new segment: Crumby Pictures Presents.

The focus of Crumby Pictures Presents is our self-regulation curriculum. Self-regulation is a set of critical skills for preschoolers that affects children socially, behaviorally, and academically.  Unfortunately, children often begin kindergarten without important skills such as being able to follow directions, stay on task with focused attention, and regulate their own emotions using concrete strategies. Kindergarten teachers report that over half of their students start school lacking good self-regulation abilities even though they are seen by many as being more essential for school readiness than academic skills such as counting or recognizing letters.

Fortunately, self-regulation skills can be taught during the preschool years and development of these skills happens rapidly. These skills and strategies are at the center of every laugh and lesson learned in Crumby Pictures Present.

To learn more about Season 44 and all the laughs Cookie Monster, Armando, and the whole gang have in store, click here.

share this +
printprint
divider

July 15, 2013

Tags
share this +

A History of Mr. Hooper’s Store

By Susan Tofte


Susie Tofte is Sesame Workshop’s former archivist.

Every good neighborhood has a gathering place.  For 44 years, that gathering place on Sesame Street has been Hooper’s Store.

The show’s creators wanted the set of Sesame Street to differ from other kids’ shows on television at the time.  Rather than stage the show in a clubhouse or other fantasy setting, the show’s action would take place on a realistic urban street.  Inspiration for the set came from the neighborhoods around New York City – complete with brownstones, a subway stop and a corner store.  The first season welcomed viewers into the apartments of Bert and Ernie and Susan and Gordon.  Neighbors met up on the stoop of 123 Sesame and the central gathering place for the neighborhood was Hooper’s Store.  Read More

share this +
printprint
divider